Working & studying in Amsterdam

Read all about studying & working in the Netherlands on Studyinholland.nl.


Studying at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam is quite demanding. However, many students manage to combine study and work.

When you have a job in the Netherlands, you must take out compulsory health insurance. The premium varies per policy. You may be entitled to financial support from the government to assist with healthcare subscription payments. See health insurance.

EU/EEA students

Residents of EU/EEA countries do not normally need a work permit, they are allowed to work in the Netherlands.

Non-EU/EEA students

Non-EU/EEA citizens may work 10 hours a week or 360 hours a year, but only if they have a Dutch residence permit. Employers need to obtain a work permit for eligible residents from outside the EU/EEA.

On this page we attempt to provide you with some insight into issues such as whether you need a work permit if you are self-employed, or what about if you are an intern? And how many hours can you work as an international student?

In the flyer Working while studying in the Netherlands, the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment answers these questions and more.

CvA students tell you about their experience of studying and working.

Burgerservicenummer (BSN)

If you have a job, your employer will need a so-called social security number, your BSN. Insurance companies may also ask for your BSN. You will receive a BSN as soon as you register with your municipality.


Dutch basic health insurance

As soon as you have a (part-time) job, you are obliged to have a Dutch basic health insurance.

Do you work as a self-employed person? Then contact the Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB) and ask for an assessment of your so-called WLZ status. The SVB will decide whether you need to take out basic insurance or not.
Read more about health insurance



International students

Working while studying

If you want to work alongside your studies while staying in the Netherlands, there are several things to consider.

Do you need a work permit when you are self-employed? How about when you do an internship? And how many hours are you allowed to work as an international student? 

In their flyer Working while studying in the Netherlands the Dutch Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment answers these questions and more. 

Dutch public health insurance 

As soon as you have a (part-time) job, you are legally required to take out Dutch public health insurance.

Do you work on a self-employed basis? Please contact the Sociale Verzekeringsbank (SVB) and request an assessment of your so-called Wlz position. The SVB will decide whether you need to take out public health insurance or not.

Read more about health insurance

Social security number

If you have a job, your employer will need to know your so-called social security number: your ‘Burgerservicenummer’ (BSN). Insurance companies may also ask for your BSN. When registering with your local authority, you are automatically issued a BSN. 

Preparations for when you want to work and study in the Netherlands



The AHK entrepreneurship programme

Art & Entrepreneurship

Many CvA alumni start working on a self-employed basis immediately after completing their studies, and many students already work on a self-employed basis during their studies. In addition, many alumni work with short term employment contracts. An entrepreneurial attitude and knowledge of entrepreneurship are essential for a successful career, both within and outside one’s own discipline, as a self-employed person and/or in a hybrid professional practice.

Within the AHK a lot of attention is therefore paid to entrepreneurship. You can read more about it here. Or go directly to the current training offer

Extras for enterprising students and alumni!

The AHK has set up the knowledge bank BeroepKunstenaar especially for students and alumni. Meet each other, enrich your knowledge, participate in courses and trainings and find answers.



Work and internships at CvA partners

The activities of the Conservatorium van Amsterdam are made possible by, among others:

Amsterdam Arena
Amsterdam Electric
Anton Kersjes van de Groenekan Fonds
Artis
Asko l Schönberg
Avedis Zildjian Company
BG France Saxophone
Bimhuis
Bitterzoet
Buffet Crampon
CBK Amsterdam-oost
Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing
Cobra Museum
Conservatorium Hotel
De Nederlandse Opera
Dijkman Muziek
Eye Filminstituut
Fonds voor Cultuurparticipatie
Grand Café-Restaurant 1e klas
Harry Bakker Saxofoons
Het Bethaniënklooster

Het Koninklijk Concertgebouw
Het Nationaal Muziekinstrumenten Fonds
Het Scheepvaartmuseum
Instituto Italiano di Cultura, Amsterdam
Jazzfest
Jazzorchestra of the Concertgebouw
Karel Hendrik van Minnen-Stichting
Keep an Eye Foundation
Koninklijk Concertgebouw Orkest
Manhattan School of Music
MarkBass
Meer Jazz Festival
Melkweg
Metropole Orkest
Mojo Concerts
Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ
Muziekgebouw Frits Philips Eindhoven
Muziekschool Amsterdam / Amstelveen
MuzyQ
Nederlands Philharmonisch Orkest
Nederlandse Orkest- en Ensemble-Academie

Nederlandse StrijkKwartet Academie
North Sea Jazz Festival
NRC Restaurant Café
Paradiso
Popsport
Prinses Christina Concours
Rabobank
Radio Kootwijk
Residentie Orkest
Selmer Paris
Stadsgehoorzaal Leiden
Stichting Jazztalent
Stichting Musici van Morgen
Stichting STEIM
Stichting Wim de Monchy
Terpstra Muziek Drumland
Topsport Amsterdam
Uitmarkt
Universiteit van Amsterdam
Van Gogh Museum
Vondelpark Openluchtheater



CvA Booking Agency

Through the CvA Booking Agency, students of the Conservatorium van Amsterdam can be booked for a concert or contribution to an event. Within all music genres there is a demand for soloists, ensembles and (big)bands to perform live on any occasion imaginable.

The CvA has appointed sessions in the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ, Paradiso, the Bimhuis and the Royal Concertgebouw, among other places. CvA students are also in popular demand internationally. Click here for a complete overview of venues where CvA students are engaged.

Contact

Interested? Contact your departmental coordinator:
Raphaela Danksagmüller classical
Bas van Otterloo jazz
Elske van der Linden pop music



Fair Practice Code

The Fair Practice Code
The Fair Practice Code is a code of conduct for doing business and working in the arts, culture and creative industry. The code invites critical reflection and offers guidance on how the sector can collectively establish a future-proof labour market and professional practice. The latest version (January 2019) of the Fair Practice Code can be found online at: http://www.fairpracticecode.nl

What is ‘Fair’ anyway? Do the online Quickscan!
On the www.fairpracticecode.nl website you can find an online Quickscan that helps you think through ten questions about the core values on which the code is based, and how you act accordingly. As you work through the scan, you will find links to existing protocols in collective labour agreements, fee guidelines, training and much more. A wealth of information, which is continuously updated.